Meet the OSU brothers who shut down Bedlam’s final drive

Meet the OSU brothers who shut down Bedlam’s final drive

The Cowboys defensive backfield is features the bond between older brother Cam Smith, a redshirt sophomore cornerback from Dylan, a freshman safety

Ben Hutchens

By Ben Hutchens

| Nov 10, 2023, 4:58pm CST

Ben Hutchens

By Ben Hutchens

Nov 10, 2023, 4:58pm CST

After Oklahoma State’s Dylan Smith intercepted a tipped pass against Kansas and fell to the turf, Cam Smith accelerated toward the ball and weaved around a few Jayhawks like the play was still ongoing. He was on a mission.

“It almost feels like I caught the pick,” Cam said. “I was trying to be the first one to get over there to get hyped with him.”

Cam wasn’t the first Cowboy defender to reach Dylan after the play that helped OSU upset Kansas 39-32 four weeks ago, but it didn’t stop him from slapping his brother’s back and getting face-to-face jumping around. 

Nothing stops the Smiths from celebrating the other’s success. Lately, the Smith brothers have had lots of success to cheer for.

Ever since injuries in the OSU secondary forced OSU to burn Dylan’s redshirt and play him against Kansas State six weeks ago, the Cowboys have been on a roll. OSU is 5-0 when both brothers play, and last week in OSU’s 27-24 Bedlam win Cam and Dylan combined to make three defensive stops on Oklahoma’s final four offensive plays.

Seventeen months separate older brother Cam, a redshirt sophomore cornerback from Dylan, a freshman safety. 

Cody Moore, the Smiths’ coach at Braswell High School, said the brothers root just as hard for each other’s success as they do their own.

“There’s not one jealous bone in their bodies,” Moore said. “I think it’s a very hard thing to find with competitive people and brothers, especially…I just think it’s very unique.”

Their parents, Charles and Dee Smith said they were going crazy in the stands watching their sons during Bedlam’s final sequence; it was a contest between them to see who could jump higher. After the game, they made their way down on the field amid thousands of celebrating fans.

Two years ago, when Oklahoma State won Bedlam, Charles stormed the same field, dropping down the seven-foot wall. This time, he was more tactical getting down. 

“We did that the first time and I said ‘Not again,’” Charles said. “That wall is a little taller than you think.”

That day in 2021, Dylan was in the stadium on a recruiting visit. His goal was to always play with his brother on a big stage. Even when he picked up offers from Arkansas, Stanford, Colorado and Houston, Charles said going to OSU was a “no-brainer”

“It was a done deal,” Moore said. “Again, it just goes back to how much he looks up to Cam and really holds him on a high pedestal. I think the possibility of them playing together outweighed everything.”

The brothers have always cherished playing on the same team. In pee-wee neighborhood flag football, the Smiths were on the same team for a season. They would come home from practice tuck their dad’s socks in their shorts and continue practicing their cadence and plays inside the house.

To begin high school, Dylan primarily played receiver. He was given the opportunity to move up to varsity if he switched to defensive back. Dylan made the switch, in part, to play with Cam.

Cam never got tired of his little brother tagging along or felt forced to drag his little brother to places. When Cam got his driver’s license, Dylan was happier than anyone, because it meant he had someone who could drive him around. 

“When you saw Cam, you saw Dylan,” Charles said. “You would think they were almost twins.”

Even though Cam was considerably taller growing up, they were sometimes mistaken for twins. It was partly because Dee often bought the same outfit, just in different colors, for her sons. It was just easier that way, she said, because nobody would be upset with what they got.

Today, the height gap has started to close. Dylan is listed at 5-foot-11 and Cam and 6-foot-2. As far as Cam is concerned, his brother will never catch him.

“Cam always says he was a couple of inches on (Dylan),” Charles said. “He’s always the tallest, Cam can be 6-foot-2 and Dylan can be 6-foot-3 and Cam will always say ‘Nah it’s the shoes or something like that.’ He’s always going to find a way to be taller.”

Freshmen on the OSU football team live in a newcomers dorm, so the brothers don’t live together. But when Cam’s roommate moved off campus, it freed up a bed in the two-bedroom dorm. Cam keeps the space clean and sometimes Dylan spends time there.

Charles said there is peace-of-mind in knowing Cam is there for his little brother. He said sometimes Cam gives Dylan the advice he would give him.

“Cam has filled the role that you would want a big brother to fill, by example,” Moore said. “He has shown Dylan how it’s supposed to be done and how you handle your business and how you approach things. What an awesome example that Dylan has had, with Cam being who he is.”

Cam said in high school, the brothers talked about their goals to continue their careers together. Those dreams are materializing.

“When we were on the field together in high school we always liked planning to be on the field together in college and in the NFL”, Smith said “It’s surreal looking to the side of me and seeing my younger brother out there as a true freshman.”

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Ben Hutchens and his twin brother Sam cover Oklahoma State for the Sellout Crowd. After a decade of living in the state, Ben finally feels justified in calling himself an Oklahoman. You can reach him at [email protected] and continue the dialogue @Ben_ Hutchens_ on social media.

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